Cart 0

Forest spirit

knockonwood pendant website.jpg
many leaves mask.jpg
norman the nose.jpg
lucky eye.jpg
gastraton.jpg
iliaflure pendant.jpg
orchid mask.jpg
big pendant.jpg
knock on wood.jpg
iliaflure ring.jpg
Forest Spirits really began in a spontaneous manner in response to the past year’s events. The idea was to find innovative ways that would remind people of tiny little details that are usually forgotten in the daily life, which are in reality quite simply, beautiful. This is expressed through two distinctive manners in the collection. On one hand, there are the wood creatures that act as talismans and on the other can be found mementos regarding visual expressions of nature. The entirety of the pieces was created in London, where Coline is a designer in residence at Sarabande: The Lee Alexander McQueen Foundation. Recently, the collection was showcased for the first time at JCK Las Vegas.
dontbegreedy website.jpg
croco website.jpg
 
 
 
Have you ever wondered how jewellery protects you? Coline and her amulets have. The idea behind these forest characters was to visually and playfully shape little spirits that would come under the form of masks and imaginary creatures. These sculpture- like compositions started off as wax hand carvings and real-life impressions from the city and its organic surroundings. Once formed, they would act as friends for your fingers that would be protective companions, if you allow them to be. Their power, neither considered good nor bad, is meant to bring emotional comfort to the wearer, just like a protective armour would shield an ancient warrior.
 
 
 
 
 
Furthermore, colours are always an important part of Coline’s work. This can be seen through her use of vitreous enamel such as the three blue-eyed face EyeSeeYou and vibrant stones like on knockonwood pendant featuring a green topaz, helping them come alive. Another amulet that stands out is a wood creature wrapped around your finger called DontBeGreedy. The silver creature holds a blue topaz in its mouth, clearly keeping it for itself, intentionally emphasizing the essential need to share this planet’s richness.
dontbegreedy website.jpg

Forest spirit - Fine jewellery

gold earrings website.jpg
gold leaves ring.jpg

 

The second part of the Forest spirit collection embodies natural details, such as twigs and leaves. These more fine-jewellery pieces remain contemporary through their design whilst being made intentionally by traditional techniques.

A few examples of these are the DetachableLeaves earrings and the StoneAndLeaves ring. The former allows movement, as if dancing with the wearer, whilst the latter has an unconventional way of setting the stone. One is made of four detachable leaves hanging from a green topaz whilst the other is worn on the hand instead of the finger. These contrasts offer different perspectives expressing playful and tangible reminders of our world’s primary beauty, which the viewer gets to wear and share.
Overall, Forest Spirits remain a hopeful gesture regarding both sustainability and humanity’s harmony with one another.

stone and leaves ring silver together.jpg
stone and leaves ring.jpg
stone and leaves earrings.jpg
silver leaves ring.jpg
leaves earrings website.jpg
gold earrings website.jpg

Unconventional Femininity

The research for this collection began by questioning traditional views of femininity and gender. I looked at a Jewellery making supplier Christmas 2015 catalogue, found the double page dedicated “to her” and hesitated between bursting in laughter or crying. It was filled with pink pliers, sparkling hearts, strings of perfect round pearls and kitten motifs. From this page emerged an exploration on gender representation, symbols of femininity within jewellery and their apparent lack of evolution throughout the years.

Pearl ring website.jpg

I found gender is a social construction which comes with a set of rules to adhere to, however these laws are not broad or flexible enough. Why not be more playful with those rules to really express who you want to be today and re-invent yourself tomorrow? My collection aims to raise questions about identity and how we can choose to express it through adornment and more specifically jewellery. I was influenced during my researches by people like Iris Apfel who act with an enviable freedom when it comes to dressing up. She always has colourful clothes and big accessories. The purpose of the collection was not to create more rules or tell people what to do but try to make them challenge their choices with humour and hopefully help them to become more playful with jewellery. 

 The Brain ring, 2016; fine silver, vitreous enamel, green topaze. 

The Brain ring, 2016; fine silver, vitreous enamel, green topaze. 

I developed a body of work which is mainly based on contrasts: man-made/nature-made; delicate/heavy; bright colours/pastel colours. I chose to work with traditional jewellery techniques such as wax carving and enamelling, because they are techniques which people are familiar with. I can then use them more boldly and create a new visual language for the viewer. My aim is to make the wearer engage with each piece of jewellery by interacting with the hidden and moving parts. The element of surprise in my work helps the viewer ask himself questions as he is never completely sure what he is looking at. I am partly using ready-made pieces which I cast which reference a lot of objects from my environment in the city. It makes my pieces recognisable for the public and at the same time different from what they already know. My work wants to question gender, identity, the objects and environment we use to define ourselves without giving any definite answers. The colours used are the primary colours because they are the base to create all the other colours as if you were given the basis to create your own identity. It is necessary to notice that colours are an important part of my work and therefore chosen very carefully, as they all respond to each other which makes the collection visually cohesive. 

I built up this collection with a narrative in mind so that each piece has a specific order. It is divided in three parts as follow: an opening piece, two mini-series (each constituted of a brooch, a ring and a necklace) and a closing piece. The collection starts with the Brain ring: as everything we think about identity comes from our brain. It is symbolically opening the story on the Pearl Series which was inspired by the iconic string of pearls that every “real” woman is supposed to own. Instead of focusing on finding the perfectly round pearls, I focused on baroque pearls, shaped randomly by nature and incredibly beautiful to me. I paired the pearls with different toys to create pieces celebrating imperfections, the act of creation and the feeling of being different. The Bricks series follows and it is based on the contrast between the constructed part (symbolised by bricks) and the natural/biological part (symbolised by plants) of gender. The collection finishes with a massive pendant, regrouping all the symbols previously used emanating from the brain. The choice is left to the viewer to adopt one those metaphors, to wear them all or to create his own. It also ties up the whole collection all the way back to the starting point: the brain.

 

 

Now it is your turn to play with your identity and I hope you will enjoy it!

 

 The Brick brooch, 2016; fine silver, steel wire, vitreous enamel.

The Brick brooch, 2016; fine silver, steel wire, vitreous enamel.

 The Brick necklace, 2016; silver, vitreous enamel, gemstones.

The Brick necklace, 2016; silver, vitreous enamel, gemstones.

 The Brick ring, 2016; fine silver, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

The Brick ring, 2016; fine silver, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

 The Abacus brooch, 2016; silver, nickel wire, steel wire, freshwater pearls, one keshi dyed pearl.

The Abacus brooch, 2016; silver, nickel wire, steel wire, freshwater pearls, one keshi dyed pearl.

 The Pearl ring, 2016; silver, copper, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

The Pearl ring, 2016; silver, copper, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

 The Pearl necklace, 2016; silver, copper, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

The Pearl necklace, 2016; silver, copper, vitreous enamel, one baroque freshwater pearl.

 The back of the Brick brooch is your secret garden.

The back of the Brick brooch is your secret garden.

 Each brick spins around so you can choose what to show or hide.

Each brick spins around so you can choose what to show or hide.

 The Brain pendant, 2016; fine silver, copper, vitreous enamel, two baroque freshwater pearls.

The Brain pendant, 2016; fine silver, copper, vitreous enamel, two baroque freshwater pearls.

Pearl ring website.jpg